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The Project (2013-2015)

The project "Health workers for all and all for health workers" was a European civil society initiative that aimed at contributing to a sustainable health workforce world-wide.

The starting point

"Today over 50 countries, mainly in Africa and South Asia, suffer from a critical shortage of health personnel, while they carry a large part of the global burden of disease. In the aging societies of European countries, the number of people who need long-term care is growing, thus fuelling demand for health workers. As the labor market becomes more globalized, rising demand is driving migration and mobility amongst health personnel. The recruitment of health workers abroad is a way of meeting the domestic demand, but can worsen the shortage of qualified personnel in both low- and middle-income countries and Europe.

Action towards achieving a sustainable health workforce and strengthening health systems is a joint enterprise. In collaboration with organizations in Belgium, the UK, Italy, Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and the Netherlands, and with the support of health workers and citizens, the project «Health workers for all and all for health workers» calls upon politicians and policymakers to implement the Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel.

Through advocacy and campaigning, we contribute from Europe to a sustainable health workforce worldwide. We focus on lasting improvements in national, European and global policy, such as compliance with international agreements that benefit human resources for health. We develop and share tools for policy analysis and (inter)action to increase knowledge and understanding of human resources for health from a global health perspective."

Project outcome

A summary report on the outcome of the HW4All project at European and national level will be available here by the end of April 2016. 

After HW4All: Continued engagement

After the end of the HW4All project, civil society engagement for the implementation of the WHO Code of Practice has been sustained within the working group on Human Resources for Health (MMI HRH) of the Medicus Mundi International Network.